Things all Parents, Teachers and Carers Should Know About Mental Health Issues in Children

05 Dec '18

Things all Parents, Teachers and Carers Should Know About Mental Health Issues in Children

If you are a parent, teacher or care for children, it is essential that you understand and how to recognise and deal with children’s mental health issues. Here are just some of the things you should be aware of.

The Statistics

Whilst thought to be very uncommon, mental health affects 10-20% of children before they become an adult. It is essential that parents and teachers understand that out of character behaviour could be signs of a more serious underlying issue.

The Risks

There are certain factors that make children more at risk of developing a mental health issue early in their lives. Children with physical illness or disability are much more likely to develop a mental health issue. Also, children with difficult relationships such as victims or witnesses of domestic abuse, bullying or trauma are highly susceptible to developing mental health concerns. If a child facing any of these circumstances is showing signs of a mental health issue, it should be taken seriously.

The Signs

There are many signs which may mean a child is suffering with mental health difficulties, including:

– Changes to their sleeping pattern, over sleeping or trouble sleeping

– Withdrawing from activities they once enjoyed

– Engaging in difficult behaviour such as tantrums or running away

– Becoming overly focussed on a certain task or routine

These are just some of the signs that your child might be suffering from a mental health issue, it is always prudent to seek the advice of a professional if you have concerns.

The Strategies

What should you do if a child is exhibiting these behaviours? There are a number of proven strategies for dealing with issues. Spending at least 15 minutes per day of one-to-one time, without distraction, can help build a positive relationship and may encourage your child to open up about their difficulties, and feel supported. Similarly, understanding your child’s specific needs and being supportive of their circumstances can also improve the situation.

The Treatment

If their behaviour does not improve, it is time to seek professional help. Children’s mental health issues are usually treated with a combination of therapy and medication, and your medical advisor will be able to set out the options for you clearly and concisely to help you make the right choice.

Awesome CPD Events for teachers, social care workers and health professionals – Come and learn with us!

If you are interested in attending an inspirational Medica CPD event, where you will learn from world leading experts how to implement strategies for success, check out our events page. You can book our events online just for yourself, or for a group. For more information, you can also get in touch with us any time, and we would be glad to tell you more about how our events can help you make a difference.

Supporting Employees with Autism in the Workplace

24 Nov '18

Supporting Employees with Autism in the Workplace

Employees can be an excellent asset to your business when properly supported. That is why it is essential that you support employees with autism in your business. Regardless of whether you are a business owner, manager or fellow employee, there are a number of key steps you can take to help employees with autism thrive in a workplace setting.

Arrange Staff Training

Many of your current employees may be unaware of what autism really is, and what it can mean for those with the condition. You should arrange a training session or attend an event that will inform employees of what this means, and how best to support the employee with autism.

Take time to understand

Autism is different in each and every person. The scale is broad, and some people display certain behaviours whilst others do not. It is vital to take the time to understand ow autism manifests in the employee you are taking on, so that you can take action to support this employee fully.

Tailor the working environment

One you understand what difficulties the employee faces as a result of their autism, take steps to mitigate these factors. For example, give them their own space in your open plan office where they won’t be disturbed. Make sure the lighting or noise isn’t too distracting, or that they will not be approached by visitors if they find social interactions challenging.

Awesome CPD Events for teachers, social care workers and health professionals – Come and learn with us!

If you are interested in attending an inspirational Medica CPD event, where you will learn from world leading experts how to implement strategies for success, check out our events page. You can book our events online just for yourself, or for a group. For more information, you can also get in touch with us any time and we would be glad to tell you more about how our events can help you make a difference.

Top Tips for Dealing with Autism Behaviours

13 Nov '18

Top Tips for Dealing with Autism Behaviours

Regardless of whether you are a teacher, social care worker, healthcare professional or from any other background, it is likely that you will at some point encounter someone with autism. This can be challenging if you are unsure of how to handle autism behaviours, but in reality there are some very simple strategies you can learn to assist you.

Be patient

It can take time for someone with autism to adapt to changes, and progress might seem slow. However, it is important that you are patient and supportive. Set small goals and track achievements.

Consistency

People with autism may find it difficult to understand social situations, and to adapt to new processes, rules or what is expected of them. Ensure that there is an element of consistency to the way you treat them, and as far as possible to their interactions with you.

Be sensitive to the sensory environment

Many people with autism find it difficult to focus where there is a lot of loud noise, and many may be alarmed by a fire drill or sudden loud noise. Try to anticipate these things and make the environment as comforting as possible for them.

Communicate well

What may seem straightforward to you or I may not be understood in the same way by a person with autism. Try to be very clear in your meaning and take the time to ensure they understand. In the same way, many people with autism struggle to communicate, particularly when they are anxious or upset. It can help not to make them feel overwhelmed, to give them space and time to consider how best to communicate what they are feeling.

Managing change

Some people with autism struggle to adapt when things change, but the best thing you can do support them is to prepare them and manage the transition. Let them know about any changes in advance and set out clearly what will happen.

Offer a safe space

If a person with autism is seeming to become anxious or distressed, offer them a quiet, safe space they can be alone and calm down. Even offer a calming activity.

Awesome Autism Education CPD Events for teachers, social care workers and health professionals

If you are interested in attending an inspirational Medica CPD event, where you will learn from world leading experts how to implement strategies for success, check out our events page. You can book our events online just for yourself, or for a group. For more information, you can also get in touch with us any time and we would be glad to tell you more about how our events can help you make a difference.

Could Apple’s new Software Reduce Anxiety in Teens?

30 Sep '18

Could Apple’s new Software Reduce Anxiety in Teens?

In a world of rapidly evolving technology, it has been suggested that constant connectivity through social media is leading to a rise in anxiety and mood disorders among teenagers. A study carried out in 2011 – at the height of smartphone adoption – noted a sharp spike in anxiety and mental health problems among teenagers. Apple have recently responded to this problem by developing software that allows users to limit the amount of time they spend on their phones, but will this have an impact? Perhaps not. A recent article in the New York times highlighted that while, yes smartphone addiction may contribute to mental health problems among teens, this may be a symptom of a number of deeper problems, relating to uncertainty.

As it stands, teenagers and young adults are facing greater worry and uncertainty around their careers and finances than ever before. They are the first generation that can expect to be financially worse off than their parents. At the same time, they are bombarded with information- which may be ‘fake news’ about the world they live in. What is their escape from these problems? Consuming more conflicting information and viewing lives of luxury and excess online.

Arguably, reducing screen time could assist with teenage anxiety, but it is also essential to address underlying problems and child and teenage mental health more generally. We offer a wide variety of events covering children and teenage mental health. Take a look at what we have coming up here.

Awesome CPD Events for teachers, social care workers and health professionals – Come and learn with us!

If you are interested in attending an inspirational Medica CPD event, where you will learn from world leading experts how to implement strategies for success, check out our events page. You can book our events online just for yourself, or for a group. For more information, you can also get in touch with us any time and we would be glad to tell you more about how our events can help you make a difference.

Noticeable Rise in Under-19s Mental Health Treatment under NHS

05 Sep '18

Noticeable Rise in Under-19s Mental Health Treatment under NHS

Recent NHS figures have shown that a record number of young people are being referred to the NHS for treatment of mental health issues. Almost 400,000 young people aged under 19, are being referred in England alone. However, it is likely that these figures have risen so dramatically in recent years as the public become more aware of mental health issues, and more young people are seeking help with mental illness. This has been welcomed by many experts working in the healthcare sector, but greater support is required to manage the increasing numbers of children suffering.

Supporting Young People with Mental Illness

In April 2018, there were a total of 389,727 “active referrals” for people aged 18 or younger this is around 33% higher than the same month in 2016, according to the statistics published by NHS Digital. The number of young people seeking help for conditions such as eating disorders, anxiety and depression is rising, but psychiatrists who specialise in children and young people’s mental health are pleased by the increasing number of referrals, as it means that more people are getting the help they need. However, at present the NHS workforce is not equipped to cope with such a sharp rise in numbers, and greater support is needed to ensure that each and every young person is properly treated.

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, the chair of the child and adolescent faculty at the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said:

“It is great to see that more and more young people are having their mental health problems identified … Mental health is clearly becoming less taboo, and services are becoming more accessible.

“But to treat such a large group, we need a great enough workforce. Current demand is far outstripping supply. Child and adolescent psychiatrists fell by 6.6% between May 2013 and May 2017.”

It is clear there is a need for greater support for children and young people when it comes to both recognising the symptoms of mental health issues and getting them thehelp they need. Here at Medica CPD, we bring specialist children’s health experts to our events, to give you expert insight into how you can make a difference to the lives of children around you. Check out our upcoming events page to see what we have in store.

Book a Children’s Health CPD Event Today

If you are interested in attending an inspirational Medica CPD event, where you will learn from world leading experts how to implement strategies for success, check out our events page. You can book our events online just for yourself, or for a group. For more information, you can also get in touch with us any time and we would be glad to tell you more about how our events can help you make a difference.